Mounting Motors

For my final project I was inspired by this coin eating robot I found online and wanted to create my own little coin eating monster. I actually though it was going to be simple at first but I was totally WRONG! This was by far one of the most challenging projects I have take on. I first started by laser cutting my pieces in cardboard to create a small prototype and understand how this was going to work. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RgUQXgQumng

Prototype


I then changed the dimensions of my piece and made it a little bit bigger. I had to make a lot of calculations as to where to laser cut the holes for the rod to go in and created proper mounts for my motor by adding two slots on my base for the mounts to sit in.

BRAINSTORM 2

LASER CUTTER FILE

 

 

 

 

PROTOTYPE 2

I tested my dimensions for the mount with cardboard again before laser cutting  wood just to make sure that the motor would fit in perfectly.

TESTING 1

After laser cutting all my pieces in wood, I drilled my L brackets in to put the box together. I then used a standoff to create a stronger mount.

I soon realized that because it was really hard to straighten the wire I found on the hardware store it would be really hard to trigger my rod to rotate because it created friction and therefore the height of mount needed to be increased. Also the holes that I made on the laser cutter for my rod to go through were a tinny bit smaller than what they should have been so I drilled in a bigger hole that ended up being a mistake because the hole was just too big to keep the rod stable. After my motor stopped working, I  finally decided to remake the whole box  after my motor stopped working and  because I really felt I could make it much more functional this time. I decided to create the straight rod myself and found a stick on the shop and laser cut this small bridge that would trigger the spindle easily. This is an image of my old rod and the new rod I made out of wood:

FINAL TRY & THOUGHTS

This time I decided not to use a standoff because the slots I had created already created a strong mount so ti was unnecessary to also use a standoff. I connected my motor to power but the spindle would still not rotate. In fact, not only it did not rotate but every time the spindle touched the rod it would ruin the spindle from friction and would cause the spindle to stop rotating. I should have used a different motor, one that doesn’t turn that fast but it was already too late to get a new one. I also should have used different material than wood because it was really to heavy and would make it even harder for movement to be generated. After not sleeping for 2 days, I decided to stop working on it and reflect on what I did wrong and how I could keep working on this to make it work.


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